Ten Points on Poor Podium Use by Presenters

Encounters with podiums are frequent occurrences for people giving presentations. However, many people do not understand the benefits and pitfalls of using a podium when presenting. Acknowledging what may be wrong at the podium can be helpful to improve a presenter’s capabilities. This knowledge is further enhanced by learning tips at the podium or alternatives to using the podium. Below are ten points for presenters to consider before their next presentation behind a podium.

  1. Swaying back and forth behind podium makes the presenter look nervous and is distracting to the audience. Standing relaxed with legs a few inches apart and the knees not locked may help prevent the presenter from rocking motions.
  2. Leaning on the podium can either make the presenter looked too relaxed and casual or so lazy/dizzy that they must lean on something to keep from falling over. Presenters should stand behind or to the side of a podium rather than use the podium as support for their body.
  3. If the presenter is gesturing below the top of podium, this defeats the purpose of using gesturing as a visual tool. Gestures should be high enough and grand enough for the audience to see and understand how the gesture emphasizes the presenter’s point. If the podium is too high and the microphone allows, the presenter may choose to move to the side when emphasizing with a gesture.
  4. Presenters reading too much from prepared notes on top of the podium prevents eye contact with the audience. The presenter should know their topic well enough to only use notes as an outline for prompts to pick up where they left off after questions have interrupted their flow. If a presenter is uncomfortable with being separated from their notes, they can stand to the side of the podium and move behind it when they need to check notes.
  5. Grasping the podium may send the message that the presenter is nervous or angry about speaking to the audience, depending on their accompanying facial expression. If the presenter is prone to grabbing the podium, they may prefer to stand next to the podium, stand in front of the podium, or not have a podium to prevent this.
  6. Tapping or banging on podium is irritating to the audience and may send a negative message rather than emphasizing a point if that was the intention. Don’t use the podium to produce sound effects because it is never as effective as expected.
  7. Presenter podiums may be in a fixed location or they may be adjustable. If moving the podium is an option, then place it in a location that works best for talking to your audience, which is typically in the front and centered among the group. If the podium is fixed and its location restricts movement or audience interaction, then the presenter should determine if other options exist besides using the podium for their presentation.
  8. Hiding behind the podium may reduce some presenter’s fear of speaking; however the podium does separate the presenter from their audience somewhat. If the microphone is placed on the podium then the speaker may have no choice but to stay behind the podium or move the microphone to a preferred side where they will stand when speaking so they may still be heard.
  9. If a presenter is small or soft-spoken, they may require a podium with a microphone to amplify their voice. However, a microphone based podium may restrict the presenter or be harder for the presenter to reach. In this case, the presenter may request a wireless microphone or make sure they get to the presentation place early enough to adjust the microphone. The presenter should check with the person arranging the program to determine is a wireless microphone is available instead of the podium one if they prefer to can use it.
  10. Often a presenter is introduced by someone who may know little about them and therefore fumbles through their introduction at the podium. The introduction should show the presenter’s qualifications for giving the presentation. So the presenter should prepare some information for their introduction for this person to read. Then before the program starts, find out who is introducing the presenter and let that person know an introduction has been prepared and placed for them to use on the podium.

After consideration of these ten points, the presenter’s awareness is increases and their next presentation behind a podium should be better. A greater understanding of the benefits and pitfalls of using a podium is very helpful for presenter improvement and development of presentation capabilities. Presenters should use the tips and alternatives offered in these ten points to make better presentations and gain greater audience satisfaction as a result.

Debt Negotiation – Negotiating the Debt For Better Financial Health!

Debt negotiation is a common process. During this process, people hired by a debtor try and negotiate the loan amount with credit companies. Generally after this negotiation, the loan amount negotiated is not just lower, the debtor is also freed from all the loans after consolidation of all loans after this one.

Debt negotiation helps all those who have been experiencing financial difficulties. It is not for all those experiencing difficulties, it is also for those who are found to be totally unable to pay off such loans. This study is made by the counselors hired by the person. The credit company may or may not agree to this negotiation, if it feels that the person can very well pay off the loan.

The benefit of negotiation happens that the person who is in debt can pay off at least minimum of loan amount. This saves the credit company from hiring legal teams, filing foreclosure and also trying to get money by selling of person’s assets. However, in case where the fixed asset is not mortgaged, it is common that the company may end up losing up all the money that is owned by the creditor.

Debt negotiation is one of the common processes during debt settlement and debt arbitration. This negotiation needs to be done, in case the debt is to be repaid at least in part to the company. Negotiation will always help a debtor against bankruptcies.

During debt negotiation there are a variety of things taken under consideration. These are the earning capacity, number of persons earning, total income of the family as against total debt and liabilities. This also ascertains whether or not the family or individual will be able to repay the loan. If it is found that the loan cannot be repaid rather only the amount if negotiated can be repaid, in such cases companies allow debt negotiation. If it is found that the family or individual can repay loan the credit company will try to get complete amount from the person.

Most of the times debt negotiation is done by credit counselor. This could be a person working privately for a company or could be an independent entity. In both cases, it is the main aim of this person to get your debt reduced considerably. You may have to pay this person, however it need not me immediate. At times the payment is determined depending upon how much debt has been actually reduced. Commission payment is always the calculated as percentage of amount reduced in debt. Payment terms are determined by both parties mutually.

Upon reduction in debt, terms of payment, rate of interest and duration of the loan is also determined. Generally after debt negotiation, fresh papers are prepared. It depends on the credit company to determine whether or not credit rating of this person would be affected.

Check out more information on commercial debt counseling here!

Trial Presentation – Glossary of Terms

When people go to trial in court, it can sometimes be boring for jurors and people sitting in the courtroom, watching to find out what happened in the civil lawsuit. Some lawyers are exciting, while others are boring. Sometimes, the very nature of a case is uninteresting. Lawyers need to explain complex ideas so that everyone understands. One way to make court cases more interesting and easier to understand is through trial presentation and special preparation. For the most part, the more, the better. There are special terms that describe some of the things lawyers and their helpers do before, during and after a trial. Some of them are as follows:

Document Review
Lawyers always ask people to produce documents when they are involved in a civil court case. Someone needs to look at them before they are handed over to the other side to make sure that what has been requested is the most accurate information and that the other people are, in fact, entitled to have it. Some of them get stamps and stickers put on; others do not.

Video Synching
Witnesses that have their depositions taken in front of attorneys, a court stenographer and video cameras are under oath. New computer technology makes the video digital and the written record electronic. They can be combined for one audio-visual package.

Day-In-The-Life
When people are affected by a physical or emotional injury, the lawyers sometimes want to give jurors an understanding of what life is like at home for this person on an everyday basis. A legal videographer will put together a day-long video of typical activities and life-style adjustments that have occurred as a result of the incident.

Graphics
Statistical data should be jazzed up with graphics and computer-based presentation programs to help people better understand the information given. Examples are charts, graphs and maps.

War Room
During lengthy trials, both parties may “camp out” in special conference rooms at an office or hotel. These are affectionately dubbed war rooms. Two groups may relay their time spent in the courtroom and the war room, depending on which witnesses are testifying and which lawyers are questioning witnesses.

Opening and Closing Statements
When a trial starts and ends, the attorneys involved give a brief summary at the beginning and end of the case. This usually happens before and after the witnesses go to the stand for questioning. The statements presented by lawyers can be difficult to pay attention to or to understand. Sometimes they do all the talking; sometimes they bring in specially designed slides and photos to supplement their opening and closing statements.